User Tools

Site Tools


wiki:software:ccdr:faq

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
wiki:software:ccdr:faq [2019/02/14 11:58]
dizwell [6.0 What metadata do we get to set, then?]
wiki:software:ccdr:faq [2019/06/11 15:47] (current)
dizwell [14.0 What are the weird symbols shown when ripping?]
Line 34: Line 34:
  
 ===== 5.0 Why don't you fetch and use metadata from the Internet? ===== ===== 5.0 Why don't you fetch and use metadata from the Internet? =====
-Because it's always rubbish. Here, for example, is what abcde makes of a 2002 recording of William Walton'​s //​Belshazzar'​s Feast// (which happens to be paired with Ralph Vaughan Williams'​ //Job//):+Because it'​s ​//**always**// rubbish. Here, for example, is what abcde makes of a 2002 recording of William Walton'​s //​Belshazzar'​s Feast// (which happens to be paired with Ralph Vaughan Williams'​ //Job//):
  
   Retrieving 1 CDDB match...done.   Retrieving 1 CDDB match...done.
Line 73: Line 73:
  
 ===== 6.0 What metadata do we get to set, then? ===== ===== 6.0 What metadata do we get to set, then? =====
-Quite a bit; in fact, nearly everything you would sensibly ​need to make sense of the music, except for the track titles (which need setting after the rip, using whatever tagging software you prefer).+Quite a bit; in fact, nearly everything you would need to make sense of the music in most music player/​managers, except for the track titles (which need setting after the rip, using whatever tagging software you prefer). ​We don't bother setting esoteric information like the recording engineer or the key of the work, though!
  
-You are asked questions about the musical ​work on the CD that's being rippedit's name, who its composer is, what year it was recorded and what musical genre it belongs to. The name you type in becomes both the "​Album"​ tag //and// the sub-directory of your Music folder within which the ripped audio tracks will be stored.+You are asked questions about the work you're ripping:
  
-When you supply a composer ​name, that becomes ​the "​Artist",​ "Album Artist",​ "Composer", "​Original ​Artist" ​tagsthe same valueas typed by you, is set for all fourYou will need to add details such as orchestraconductorprinciple soloists and so on in the '​Comments'​ tag field manually afterwards.+  * It'​s ​name 
 +  * Who wrote it 
 +  * Who's conducting it  
 +  * What genre it belongs to 
 +  * What year it was recorded. 
 + 
 +The 'who wrote it' answer is used to populate ​the Composer ​and Artist tags. The '​name'​ becomes ​the '​Album'​along with the surname of the conductor ​you mention. Thus**War Requiem** conducted by **John Eliot Gardiner**, becomes //War Requiem (Gardiner)//​The conductor'​s name is also entered into the Comment tag, though it will need to be fleshed out laterusing other tagging toolswith further details of the complete set of performers
  
 Track numbers are set automatically,​ though you are allowed to specify a 'track offset'​ by which physical track 1 (say) becomes labelled as ripped track 15 (or whatever other number you choose). Track numbers are set automatically,​ though you are allowed to specify a 'track offset'​ by which physical track 1 (say) becomes labelled as ripped track 15 (or whatever other number you choose).
Line 84: Line 90:
  
 The "​Encoded By" tag is also set to indicate that CCDR was used as the ripping tool (I needed a way to tell which bits of my own collection had been ripped accurately by CCDR versus those bits which hadn'​t). The "​Encoded By" tag is also set to indicate that CCDR was used as the ripping tool (I needed a way to tell which bits of my own collection had been ripped accurately by CCDR versus those bits which hadn'​t).
 +
 +Naturally, you are only asked the questions about piece name, composer and so on **once** -which could be considered a problem if you've got a CD with multiple works by different composers. In that case, however, you can choose to select only //some// of the tracks on the CD to be ripped; the answers to the questions you supply can be correct for just those tracks. Then you can choose to //not// eject the CD at the end of that rip, and re-run CCDR to rip the other tracks with different answers to the questions that are now appropriate for the second set of tracks to be ripped. Keep re-ripping different parts of the CD with different answers supplied until the entire CD is ripped -and for the last ripping run, choose to eject the CD when finished. ​
 ===== 7.0 What type of tag do you set? ===== ===== 7.0 What type of tag do you set? =====
-The subject of tagging ​flac files can get rather complicated! For a start, you are //​supposed//​ to only use '​Vorbis Comments'​ to tag flacs, but flacs can quite happily store the ID3 tags (with various versions!) as well as the Vorbis ones. If a particular flac file contains **both** types of tag at the same time, it then becomes a bit of a lottery as to which one your chosen media player will use for display purposes!+The subject of tagging ​digital audio files can get rather complicated! ​
  
-To try and end the confusion, CCDR only tags files with the Vorbis-type ​tags, since it only ever outputs FLAC-encoded rips (and these ought to use the Vorbis tags exclusively)Media players that are coded //​only// ​to display ID3 tags will therefore regard your files as completely un-tagged... but that's their problem, not yours (rectified by getting a better media player!)+If you create (lossy) MP3 files, you are supposed to tag them with "​ID3" ​tags. If you create ​(lossy) Ogg Vorbis files, you are instead supposed ​to tag them with "Vorbis" ​tags. And when you create (lossless) FLAC files, you are supposed ​to tag them with... Vorbis tags.
  
 +Where it starts getting tricky is that there are various //​versions//​ of ID3 tags: ID3v1 only allowed a few, very short tags. ID3v2 allowed lots more, variable-length tags. And then there are different versions of the ID3v2 standard, to boot! Different media players can read different types of ID3 tags (and not read others, if you happen to get really unlucky!)
 +
 +And to pile on the confusion, whilst FLAC files are supposed to be tagged with Vorbis tags, they can //​simultaneously//​ store ID3 tags... and when a single FLAC files stores both types of tag, it's mostly pot-luck as to which ones a particular media player will choose to read and display.
 +
 +Since CCDR only ever outputs FLAC files, it only tags files with the Vorbis tags. This makes it a well-behaved FLAC-using application,​ doing things "​properly"​. Unfortunately,​ those media players or other tools that are coded //only// to work with ID3 tags will therefore regard your files as completely un-tagged. But that's their problem, not yours (and is easily rectified by getting a better media player!)
 ===== 8.0 What is the track offset I'm asked to supply? ===== ===== 8.0 What is the track offset I'm asked to supply? =====
 Well, first: it's **optional** to supply a track offset. ​ Well, first: it's **optional** to supply a track offset. ​
Line 94: Line 107:
 If you do provide one, though, it is simply added (or subtracted) to the track number actually recorded on the CD. If you do provide one, though, it is simply added (or subtracted) to the track number actually recorded on the CD.
  
-For example, let'​s ​say you have a CD containing Beethoven'​s symphonies 4 and 5Each has 4 movements, so there will be 8 tracks on the CD. Tracks ​1-4 are going to belong to Symphony No. 4; Tracks 5-8 will be those of Symphony No. 5. When you rip Symphony No. 5, you don't want its tracks ​to be numbered 5, 6, 7 and 8. Instead, because it's a work in its own right, you want them numbered 1, 2, and 4.+As an example: Leoš Janáček'​s ​opera //Jenůfa// is supplied (in my Mackerras recording from 1983) on 2 CDs. CD 1 consists ​of 13 tracks, ​CD has another 15 -of which the last is actually the standalone overture //​Žarlivost//​, and so not technically part of the opera at all.
  
-So, when you rip tracks 1-4 using the 'rip part of a CD' featureyou'd specify "​1-4"​ as the range and no offset. Physical ​track 1 thus gets labelled as ripped ​track 1, and so onBut when you then rip tracks 5-8you'd specify "​5-8"​ as the range and "​-4"​ as the offset. Physical track 5 thus gets labelled ripped track 1 (because 5 + -4 = 1) and physical track 6 gets labelled as ripped track 2 (because 6 + -4 =2), and so on.+When I rip the first CD, everything is fine: all 13 tracks belong to the opera and start from track 1, incrementing steadily to track 13For ripping this CDthere is no need to supply a track offset ​at all.
  
-Often you will want to go the other way around: your boxed set of Götterdämmerung comes on 4 CDsSay disk has 20 tracks on it. That means you want the 1st physical track of disk 2 to be labelled ​as ripped track 21So you'​d ​supply ​the offset ​"​20"​Physical ​track 2 would then also become ​ripped ​track 22 (because 2 20 22), and so on.+But when I rip the second CD, I don'​t ​want its first track to be numbered '​1',​ but '​14',​ since it'​s ​the 14th track of the //opera//, regardless of being the first track of the second CDWhen I rip this CD, therefore, I will ask for a track offset of 13. CCDR will then add that number to the physical track number, and thus physical track will become ripped track 14. Physical track 2 will similarly become ripped track 15 and so on: basically, all tracks on the second CD will have their physical track numbers augmented by '​+13',​ the supplied track offset number. 
 + 
 +However, only 14 of the 15 tracks on this second CD actually belong ​to the opera. The 15th is a standalone overture derived from it. It shouldn'​t ​be included in the Jenůfa "​album",​ but be stored separately and numbered uniquely, too. 
 + 
 +So, in fact, when I rip the second CD of the set, I would choose to supply a track range of 1-14 to rip, as well as a track offset of 13. That then gets all of Jenůfa ​ripped ​correctly, as one '​work'​ and with continually-ascending ​track numbers from 1 to 27. 
 + 
 +I'​d ​then perform a second rip of the second CD, specifying to rip only the last track on that CD (track 15), but supplying a track offset ​of -14 (i.e., negative 14). As before, CCDR just adds the physical ​track number to the supplied track offset, and since 15 + -14 = 1, this one-track rip to a work called //​Žarlivost//​ will become track number 1 of a brand-new '​album'​. 
 + 
 +In short, **physical track number ​offset ​ripped track number**. And we can play with this equation with both positive and negative numbers supplied as the offset to either join tracks from multiple CDs into one workor to take just part of a single CD and declare it to be a work of its own whose tracks correctly start at '​1'​. 
 + 
 +Leaving the offset blank (i.e., just pressing Enter) is the same as typing in an offset of zero: both mean "I am happy to have the physical CD's track number become the ripped track'​s track number.
  
-Basically, **physical track number + offset = ripped track number**. ​ 
  
-And leaving the offset blank means '​don'​t apply an offset at all, so just rip everything with their physical track numbers only'. 
 ===== 9.0 What's the 'only rip part of a CD' all about? ===== ===== 9.0 What's the 'only rip part of a CD' all about? =====
 CDs often contain many separate works on the one physical disk. For example, it's quite common to see Beethoven symphonies '​paired'​ on a CD, so you'll get Symphony No. 1 and 2 on the one CD. CDs often contain many separate works on the one physical disk. For example, it's quite common to see Beethoven symphonies '​paired'​ on a CD, so you'll get Symphony No. 1 and 2 on the one CD.
Line 119: Line 140:
  
   * cdparanoia ​   * cdparanoia ​
-  * ffmpeg ​**or** flac (if both are present, flac is used preferentially)+  ​* flac 
 +  ​* ffmpeg
   * awk   * awk
   * lssci   * lssci
   * wget   * wget
   * grep   * grep
-  * cdrecord +  * cdrecord ​(or wodim, depending on your distro).
-  * metaflac+
   ​   ​
 Many of those are standard parts of any Linux installation and I'd be surprised if they weren'​t already present (awk, grep and so on). But if any of them are not present when you first run CCDR, you will be told. It's then up to you to install the particular applications using whatever tools your distro gives you. For example, to install ffmpeg on OpenSuse 15, you type //sudo zypper install ffmpeg//. On Ubuntu, it would be //sudo apt install ffmpeg//, and so on. Many of those are standard parts of any Linux installation and I'd be surprised if they weren'​t already present (awk, grep and so on). But if any of them are not present when you first run CCDR, you will be told. It's then up to you to install the particular applications using whatever tools your distro gives you. For example, to install ffmpeg on OpenSuse 15, you type //sudo zypper install ffmpeg//. On Ubuntu, it would be //sudo apt install ffmpeg//, and so on.
  
 ===== 11.0 What Linux Distros does CCDR run on? ===== ===== 11.0 What Linux Distros does CCDR run on? =====
-use OpenSuse 15 as my principal desktop O/S, so CCDR has been written on that and tested extensively on it. It's also been tested on virtual machines running Ubuntu 18.04 and Fedora 29. It //should// work on pretty much any disto, but if it fails to do so on a specific one, please email me at [email protected] with full details about your O/S of choice and I'll see what I can do about it.+used OpenSuse 15 as my principal desktop O/S, so CCDR was written on that and tested extensively on it. It's also been tested on virtual machines running Ubuntu 18.04 (using the Gnome desktop) ​and Fedora 29 (using XFCE): 
 + 
 +{{ :​wiki:​software:​ccdr:​virtualbox_fedora_xfce_15_02_2019_11_07_26.png?​direct&​600 |}} 
 + 
 +I've did recently switch to using Debian Testing as my main desktop O/S, so I've recently re-worked CCDR to run on that without issue, too (Debian deprecated cdrecord -one of CCDR's dependencies- a long time ago and uses **wodim**, a fork of it, instead. Therefore, CCDR on Debian now checks for the presence of wodim and prompts for its install if it can't find it). 
 + 
 +And then I switched (hopefully for the last time, but you wouldn'​t want to bet your house on it!) to ArcoLinux (a flavour of Arch), so it definitely works on that these days (and thus on equivalent distros such as Manjaro). 
 + 
 +It //should// work on pretty much any disto, but if it fails to do so on a specific one, please email me at [email protected] with full details about your O/S of choice and I'll see what I can do about it.
  
 ===== 12.0 Why don't you install the software dependencies automatically?​ ===== ===== 12.0 Why don't you install the software dependencies automatically?​ =====
wiki/software/ccdr/faq.1550145519.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/02/14 11:58 by dizwell