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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 254 total)
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  • #11517
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Walter Piston’s Symphony No. 8  
    Jorge Mester, The Louisville Orchestra
    Duration:     00:23:31

     

    #11518
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Franz Krommer’s Concerto for two clarinets Op. 35
    Kalman Berkes (conductor and clarinet), Nicolaus Esterhazy Sinfonia
    Duration:     00:20:07

     

    #11519
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Béla Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta
    Herbert von Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
    Duration:     00:31:31

    #11520
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Johannes Ockeghem’s Missa Mi-mi
    Rebecca Stewart, Cappella Pratensis
    Duration:     00:55:29

    #11521
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Charles Hubert Parry’s Symphony No. 1              
    Matthias Bamert, London Philharmonic Orchestra
    Duration:    00:42:47

    #11522
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Henryk Górecki’s Symphony No. 3                                           
    David Zinman, London Sinfonietta, Dawn Upshaw (soprano)
    Duration:    00:53:42

    #11524
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Herbert Howells’ Hymnus Paradisi                                                                                                                            
    Richard Hickox, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Joan Rodgers, Anthony Rolfe-Johnson, BBC Symphony Chorus, Alan Opie
    Duration:    00:46:50

    #11525
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Arthur Sullivan’s Trial by Jury
    Malcolm Sargent, Pro Arte Orchestra, Glyndebourne Festival Chorus, George Baker, Owen Brannigan, Elsie Morrison
    Duration:    00:32:56

    #11526
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Erwin Schulhoff’s Cinq Études de jazz  
    Frank Dodge, Spectrum Concerts Berlin
    Duration:    00:12:54

    I had not heard of Erwin Schulhoff until a video by David Hurwitz recommended his symphonies. Turns out he was a pretty decent composer of most classical music forms, and these piano pieces are very enjoyable. He was heavily influenced by jazz in the mid-1920s on, and this persisted until the early 1930s. Unfortunately, he was a Czech Jew; he was also a committed communist (having set the Communist Manifesto to music in 1932!) and things therefore took a not-unexpected turn for the worse in 1939: the Nazis had him imprisoned in the Wülzburg concentration camp in Bavaria, where he died of tuberculosis in 1942.

    #11527
    hjr
    Keymaster

     

    Bohuslav Martinů’s Échec au Roi   
    Jiří Bělohlávek, Prague Symphony Orchestra
    Duration:    00:27:45

    So now it’s interesting to know that there are two ballets essentially called ‘Checkmate’! Which came first: the Bliss or the Martinů? Well, the Martinů dates from 1930; the Bliss from 1937. There is no suggestion that the one is derived from, or inspired by, the other! But as a long-time fan of the Bliss ballet, it is a bit of revelation to discover the same sort of subject being addressed nearly a decade earlier by someone from a completely different composing tradition.

     

    #11528
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Niels Gade’s Symphony No. 6      
    Christopher Hogwood, Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Duration:    00:25:55

    #11529
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Vagn Holmboe’s Chamber Concerto No. 8, Op. 38          
    Hannu Koivula, The Danish Radio Concerto Orchestra
    Duration:    00:21:07

    #11530
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Claude Debussy’s La Mer                                                                             
    Leonard Bernstein, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
    Duration:    00:26:34

    #11531
    hjr
    Keymaster

    Jan Dismas Zelenka’s Ouverture a 7 concertanti                                                                                                                                                        
    Collegium 1704
    Duration:    00:21:07

    #11532
    hjr
    Keymaster

    John Foulds’ A World Requiem
    Leon Botstein, BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, Philharmonia Chorus, Crouch End Festival Chorus, Trinity Boys Choir, Jeanne-Michèle Charbonnet (soprano), Catherine Wyn-Rogers (mezzo-soprano), Stuart Skelton (tenor), Gerald Finley (baritone)
    Duration:    01:30:04

    What Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem was to the Second World War, John Foulds’ A World Requiem was to the First. That is to say, it was written as an act of commemoration, for all those lost in the horrors of 1914-18. For many years in the 1920s and early 1930s, it was routinely performed in the Albert Hall for the November Remembrance Day commemoration service. It then somewhat mysteriously disappeared, to be practically forgotten about for 70 years or so. The difference between Britten’s work and Foulds’, however, is enormous: Britten’s is quite clearly a masterpiece and the Foulds… er, isn’t! It starts out very effectively, to be sure. But it then rather gets bogged down in grandiose and rather conventional Victorian sentimentality, with no distinctive insight such as drips off every stave of the War Requiem. I enjoy it every time I listen to it, but there’s a reason people regularly stage the Britten work and not this, I’m afraid! Which is not to say it’s bad or rubbish: it’s definitely not. It’s just that it’s an hour and a half of enjoyable listening rather than a gut-wrenching emotional journey.

     

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