ISO-handling Bug Fixes

If you rip SACDs to ISO files, which I’ve previously documented how to do, you will subsequently need to be able to split the ISOs out into separate FLAC files, in order to catalogue and tag them properly. If you do, you need to be aware of a couple of bug-fixes that have recently been made to the AUAC script and associated software.

The usual approach I take is to break apart an ISO is to issue the command: auac -i=iso. But that recently failed to work correctly, and here’s why. [...] 

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Hi-Res Audio – Part 56

I hate to keep banging on about hi-res audio formats (especially when I am not keen on them myself), but now that AUAC can do DSF as well as ISO conversions (see my last post), some interesting things have come out of the woodwork that needed tackling. It’s also the case that as lockdown finally eases, this will likely draw to a close a period of time in which I obsess about software and not a lot else… so, it’s probably best to get these things out of the way whilst there’s not a lot else to be doing!

First off is the question of why AUAC treats SACD ISOs differently from SACD DSFs. In other words, when you say auac -i=iso, you have to specify -o=hires if you want high resolution FLAC files extracted from the source SACD ISO (otherwise you get standard resolution ones)… but, if you say auac -i=dsf, you don’t (you’ll get hi-res ones by default). [...] 

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AUAC Bug Fixes

I have bumped the Absolutely Baching Universal Audio Converter script up to version 2.0 (from 1.13). The changes are minor and mostly cosmetic, but there are some bug fixes applied too, so the upgrade is recommended. Upgrade by downloading the script by clicking this link. Then, assuming you downloaded it to your $HOME/Downloads folder, just issue this command:

sudo mv $HOME/Downloads/auac.sh /usr/bin/auac.sh

The full documentation has been corrected slightly, too. [...] 

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A Universal Audio Converter

This blog post’s title is a bit of a stretch! For starters, I almost exclusively use FLAC audio files for my primary music store, so my need to be able to handle other audio formats is not exactly great. Still less do I need to handle so many different audio formats that you could describe a tool that handles them all as truly ‘universal’!

But I do have need to create MP3 copies of my FLAC music files -because I upload them to OneDrive and am able to play them from there on my phone. If I’m listening to music on my phone, it means I am visiting family, staying in a hotel, at an airport or on a train: so the loss of audio ‘fidelity’ inherent in the transition from lossless FLAC to lossy MP3 is tolerable. Those environments are not suitable for audiophile ears at the best of times! [...] 

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