tiny…

Yeah, I know I promised last time no more tinkering with AMP and the next release would be called version 2.

But version 1.22 is out anyway, representing a tiny, tiny, puny little bug-fix!

Basically, I was doing the computation for ––levelup incorrectly: I was comparing a composer’s average play-length to the global average play-length, which turns out to be a mathematically stupid thing to do. Say every Beethoven composition lasts 40 minutes. You play him 60 times

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AMP: Are we there yet?

I am aware that as new AMP feature follows new AMP feature, it can feel like a never-ending ride to who-knows-where, prompting the ‘Oh God, not another one!’ reaction, as well as the ‘Will it never end?’ one -as well as the one alluded to in the thumbnail at the right!

For the record, I think we are closing in on a feature-complete AMP that needs no major bug-fixes nor has use for substantial new pieces of functionality.

But we’re not there quite yet!

Thus AMP Version

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CAO: A Bug Fix

A quick mention that CAO (“Composition-At-Once”) has been updated to fix a mildly serious bug.

CAO turns standalone FLACs into single-file ‘superFLACs’ with an embedded cuesheet, so you still know within the one big file where all the separate tracks are meant to start and finish. CAO can also use that same information to split a superFLAC apart back into its constituent single-file FLACs.

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Another round of AMP enhancements…

Let’s start with a warning: this is quite a long post and covers quite a lot of ground! I don’t normally ‘section up’ my posts, but I will on this occasion, to try to make things clearer. So, this time we have:

  • Two new override switches for AMP
  • The removal of a switch
  • The fixing of quite a nasty bug
  • The introduction of a new composition-specific selection switch
  • An increase to the number of play ‘selections’ you’re allowed

Taking each of those in turn, therefore…

1.0 New ‘Unplayed’ and ‘Levelup’ Overrides

I’ve added a further two new override switches to AMP, bumping its version to 1.20 in the process.

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Hi-Res Audio Software – Part 3 : CAO

A short follow-up on the last post.

I mentioned that all my software scripts were now fully updated and capable of working with hi-res audio files… except that CAO, whilst perfectly happy merging per-track hi-res FLACs into single composition-at-once hi-res FLACs was unable to reverse the process (whereas, for standard CD-audio resolution FLACs, the processes are completely reversible in either direction).

I

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Colour Perception and Sorting

This is yet another story about AMP (my ever-evolving music player) being updated. This one, however, has a subtle twist that most of you probably won’t care about, let alone make use of.

It’s all to do with colour. In all my software, I try to use just four colours in a consistent way: (1) Terminal Default Foreground; (2) Bright Red; (3) Bright Yellow; and (4) Bright Blue. The terminal default will depend on what colour scheme you’ve configured your terminal to use. Commonly, as in the screenshot on the left, it’s bright green for me and my desktops. It’s used to display fairly ‘static informational’ text: things like the program name, the data labels and so on. Bright Red is used to display error or out-of-condition messages or alerts to program behaviours. Bright yellow is used to display user-input or fairly static information derived from user input (such as the folder path/name from which you’re currently playing music). Finally, Bright Blue is used to display fairly dynamic text derived from user input (the name of the database you’re using, for example, or any override switches you’ve specified that affects what music will be selected for play). I may not always be entirely consistent with the way I use my colours, but that’s the general scheme I try to use and stick to, anyway!

Unless you’re colour-blind, in which case, Lord alone knows what you will perceive the colour of any given piece of displayed text to be, if you can see it at all!

As it happens, I have my own colour-perception problems: if something is in C major, I see it (and feel it) as dark blue; in A major, it’s bright yellow; in G major, it’s a sort-of rusty red. It’s all a bit weird, frankly! Anyway, I also know that there are people out there who are more ‘conventionally’ colour-blind, in which case coding things to display in red and green, or blue and green, is probably less than helpful! So, I’ve added a new run-time switch to AMP (which bumps to version 1.17 in consequence): ––colour-light. For our American cousins, it can also be supplied as ––color-light, but really: Noah Webster should have been drowned at birth! Anyway, if that switch appears on the command line, anywhere, however it’s spelled, then the program display will be as you see it in the linked thumbnail: the green comes from whatever your choice of terminal colour scheme deems to be ‘normal’; everything else will appear as ‘white’.

There’s an additional option for those occasions where you prefer a light-themed terminal and thus displaying everything in white-on-light would not make best sense! For fans of light-coloured terminals, there is thus an equivalent new switch: ––colour-dark (which also comes in the American variant ––color-dark). If you use this dark-themed variant, all text will appear in black, not white. Something like this, then:

Finally, there’s the ––colour-neutral option (and it’s American cousin ––color-neutral), which basically makes things look like this:

…where all text will appear in bright yellow, unless it’s normal, static text provided by the program -in which case, it will appear in whatever colour ‘normal’ is defined by your terminal theme (in the above case, it would seem that ‘white’ is normal).

You may need to experiment with your terminal colour and profile appearance settings to get the desired effect, but at least you have a little more control over the appearance of things than you had before. If it’s not sufficiently flexible, you can email me and request some specific outcome and if I can make it happen, I certainly will do my best to do so. Obviously, by reducing the colour palette in these ways, you remove the ‘subtlety’ of the classes of information I alluded to at the start. No longer will you be prompted to spot the difference between mostly-static v. dynamically-derived information. But I figure it is probably better that all the program text is basically legible rather than that, in trying to convey subtlety, it becomes invisible to some people.

If you don’t have any colour perception issues, feel free to ignore the new switches: everything will simply continue to display in green, yellow, red and blue as necessary! A similar colour-changing capability has been added to all my other software scripts, too, and they’ve all incremented upwards in the version number stakes in consequence. Fresh updates for all of them are, of course, available from the usual software download page, so make sure you pick up the new capability whenever you can!

Even if you don’t have colour perception problems, you may also want the new upgrades, however, since there are a couple of bug fixes and display enhancements in most programs. Sticking purely to AMP-related news, for example, there is a new twist on the reporting capability AMP has had, almost since the first day it was written: you can now specify the number of days’ data to fetch and display. In my case, for example, if I simply say:

amp --report --dbname=main

…I will see this sort of response:

PLAYTIME           ARTIST                               ALBUM                                                                             GENRE                   DURATION 
-----------------  -----------------------------------  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------  ----------------------
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Tweaks and Twiddles

Another round of software tweaks and twiddles -mostly minor, some a little more significant.

First, AMP has been bumped a couple of notches to 1.16. It’s mostly to do with a few colour tweaks, but also an annoying bug dealing with distros that don’t have the ‘bc’ utility installed by default.  Those should all now work fine (so that’s OpenSuse, Endeavour OS,

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Roller-coaster Ride

Today has been fun, in an up-and-down and terrifying sort of way!

First the good news: I finally managed to build a pure Arch-based virtual machine with no slip-ups, mistakes or catastrophes. Installing Arch is never for the faint-hearted and I’ve done it lots of times in the past… but never done it ‘quite right’, with always something missing or not-quite-working! I accordingly long ago gave up hope of ever achieving something that seemed stable and functional. But

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