Guides to Ripping and Tagging Classical CDs

I was asked to produce a graphical guide (i.e., lots of screenshots!) to how I’d go about ripping and tagging a variety of classical music CDs, given my adherence to the Axioms of Classical Music. I decided to use Windows as the operating system to do these examples on: this in turn effectively mandated the use of Exact Audio Copy as my ripping software (because I wanted to use entirely free-of-charge software) and, as my tagging software, MP3Tag. As a media player in which to check the effectiveness of my ripping and tagging, I thought I should use MusicBee (since it came top in my comparative review of music player/managers not so long ago). You may, of course, use different software -and that’s fine. The point in these articles is to get across the principles of ripping and tagging, not the specifics as to how to use a particular piece of software.

The Windows-based articles show how I would deal with a number of diverse scenarios, as follows:

Even though you may regard the first of these scenarios as being so obvious as to not be worth investigating, I recommend you read it before reading any of the others, since it covers things which the others don’t do (such as how to install and configure the EAC music ripper, how to choose album art and so on).

An equivalent set of articles also exists for Linux users, using my Classical CD Ripper and Classical CD Tagger tools, and are available here:

  • 1 CD containing a single composition by a single composer
  • 1 CD containing two compositions by a single composer
  • 1 CD containing multiple compositions by a single composer
  • 1 CD containing multiple compositions by multiple composers
  • 1 ‘mood’ or ‘themed’ CD
  • 2+ CDs containing a single composition by a single composer
  • A large box set of symphonies by Beethoven

Again, even though you might think the first of these scenarios is a bit obvious, I suggest you give it a read anyway, since it covers how to install and configure the CCDR and CCDT tools, which the other articles in the series will already assume you know how to do.

Whether you are a Linux or a Windows user, if I’ve missed your particular favourite scenario, drop me a line (hjr@dizwell.com) or via the comments here and let me know what you’d like to see covered/explained.